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Book Feature :: The Web of Debt: The Shocking Truth About Our Money System and How We Can Break Free

27 July 2012


The Web of Debt: The Shocking Truth About Our Money System and How We Can Break Free
by Ellen Hodgson Brown

EXPLODING THE MYTHS ABOUT MONEY Our money system is not what we have been led to believe.

The creation of money has been “privatized,” or taken over by a private money cartel. Except for coins, all of our money is now created as loans advanced by private banking institutions — including the private Federal Reserve. Banks create the principal but not the interest to service their loans. To find the interest, new loans must continually be taken out, expanding the money supply, inflating prices — and robbing you of the value of your money. Web of Debt unravels the deception and presents a crystal clear picture of the financial abyss towards which we are heading. Then it explores a workable alternative, one that was tested in colonial America and is grounded in the best of American economic thought, including the writings of Benjamin Franklin, Thomas Jefferson and Abraham Lincoln.

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Chapter: Cancer

Book Feature :: National Cancer Institute and American Cancer Society: Criminal Indifference to Cancer Prevention and Conflicts of Interest

2 June 2012

National Cancer Institute and American Cancer Society: Criminal Indifference to Cancer Prevention and Conflicts of Interest by Samuel Epstein

Despite decades of false assurances, we are losing the winnable war against cancer. The hand-in-glove generals of the federal NCI and the “nonprofit” ACS have betrayed us. These institutions have spent tens of billions of taxpayer and charity dollars, promoting treatment, while ignoring strategies for preventing cancer, other than quitting smoking. As a result, cancer rates have escalated to epidemic proportions, now striking nearly one in two men and more than one in three women. Paradoxically and criminally, the more we spend on fighting cancer, the more cancer we get. And there is much more.

The NCI and ACS are rife with conflicts of interest with the cancer drug industry. This book also details how the NCI and ACS are sitting on mountains of information on avoidable causes of cancer, while failing to act on this and making it available to Congress and the public. This book explains how we can win the war against cancer with strategies including “right-to-know” laws, ensuring public dissemination of critical information on avoidable causes of cancer, and Congressional reform to ensure that the NCI protects the public rather than special interests.

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Chapter: Cancer

Book Feature :: Politics in Healing: The Suppression and Manipulation of American Medicine

1 June 2012

Politics in Healing: The Suppression and Manipulation of American Medicine by Daniel Haley

Haley gathers 12 medical outsiders’ stories to support his theory that the AMA, FDA, and big pharmaceutical companies conspire to prevent new ideas from entering medical research and practice. His subjects include Andrew Ivy, who advocated the discredited anticancer drug Krebiozen; anticancer herbalist Harry Hoxsey; anticancer blood researcher Gaston Naessens; and antineoplastin researcher Stanislaw Burzynski. Those persecuted medical investigators are fairly well known, but some of Haley’s other cases concern forgotten men like William Koch, developer of the antipolio drug Glyoxylide, whom many may find more interesting because of their obscurity.

The stories of all 12 are often absent from current medical histories, which alone makes this book worthwhile. Haley’s thesis that many of his subjects were victims of organized medicine, however, remains unproven. Moreover, his assertion that at least five of the 12 should have been Nobel laureates strains credibility, and the implication that the AMA controls the decisions of the Nobel committees seems dubious.

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Chapter: Health

Can Eating Probiotics Make You Attractive?

29 May 2012

There is much truth when you hear the saying “you are what you eat”, for there is a great connection between what we put in our mouths and the influence it imparts on our health, weight, physique as well as promote wrinkles and could even hasten the aging process.

Now researchers have revealed that probiotic-rich yogurt could impart more sexiness to those who consume them. Not only did they notice that yogurt-eating mice had shinier and thicker coats, the male mice were walking with a “swagger” which turned out to be due to testicles that were 5% heavier than those of mice fed a standard mouse diet and a full 15% heavier than those of mice forced to live on low-nutrient junk food.

In fact the MIT researchers reported in the Scientific American journal that in their mating experiments, the yogurt-eating males “inseminated their partners faster and produced more offspring,” while yogurt-eating females gave birth to larger litters and were more successful in raising them.

According to the Raw Story, the researchers “think that the probiotic microbes in the yogurt help to make the animals leaner and healthier, which indirectly improves sexual machismo.”

Interesting, another team of researchers in Harvard investigating on yogurt improving semen quality in human males reports that their preliminary findings are consistent with what they see in the mice.

Source: The Raw Story, 4 May 2012

Chapter: Health

Exercise For A Better Brain

28 May 2012

The benefits of physical exercise for brainpower has for more than a decade been established by scientists. But the latest findings has made it clear that it isn’t just related; it is THE relationship.

A report on The New York Times shows new evidence that exercise builds a brain that resists physical shrinkage and enhance cognitive flexibility.

With the help of sophisticated technologies to examine the workings of individual neurons in the brain, a study on mice has illustrated the power of physical exercise on the brain.

The animals were divided into four groups with different living settings. Group 1 lived in a world with an abundance of yummy treats and stimulating toys while group 2 had access to all of these pleasures, plus small disc-shaped running wheels in their cages. A third group’s cages had none of the luxuries but got standard treatment. And the fourth group’s homes contained the running wheels but no other toys or treats.

After going through the cognitive tests and brain tissue examination, it turned out that neither the toys nor treats, improved their brains. Only those that exercised, with or without other enrichments in their cages, had healthier brains and performed significantly better on cognitive tests than the other mice.

According to the New York Times:

“Animals that exercised, whether or not they had any other enrichments in their cages, had healthier brains and performed significantly better on cognitive tests than the other mice.

Animals that didn’t run, no matter how enriched their world was otherwise, did not improve their brainpower in the complex, lasting ways that Rhodes’s team was studying.

“They loved the toys,” Rhodes says, and the mice rarely ventured into the empty, quieter portions of their cages.

But unless they also exercised, they did not become smarter.”

Exercise builds brainpower in ways that thinking might not. Being a tissue, the brain like the rest of your muscles and organs decline in function with age and underuse. Now it

Source: New York Times, 18 April 2012

Chapter: Exercise for Health

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